Scams How to spot them in Your Industry!

Protecting the consumers from the robbers!

Top Tips to Protect Yourself Against Frauds and Scams, Identity Theft and Reduce Spam Email

This article was first published on:

What can you do to defend yourself from scams, frauds and identity theft? Whether you think you have been the victim of a fraud or scam or want to be proactive in protecting yourself, here is a list of specific and simple actions that you can take, some just once, to protect yourself and your family!  We have ranked them in order that you should take them:

  1. Don’t use or carry a checkbook. Pay by cash or credit card. Paying your bills through your bank or credit union’s online bill paying service (which is usually free) is much safer than mailing a check.
  2. Buy and use a paper shredder. Shred any documents that have your social security number or other financial information, such as your bank account numbers, credit card numbers etc.  identity thieves actually go through homeowner’s trash to obtain personal information. If you don’t have a shredder, burn these  documents completely in the fireplace.
  3. Freeze your credit! It prevents scammers from opening unauthorized accounts in your name. Even if your state is one of the few that doesn’t allow a freeze, thanks to pressure from consumer advocacy groups, you can still freeze your files at the three major credit bureaus.  See this page for more information about both freezes.
  4. Sign up on the Do-Not-Call List
  5. Sign up to block credit card offers from arriving in your mailbox.
  6. Don’t carry your Social Security card with you. When you renew your driver’s license, make sure the DMV does not use your Social Security number as your driver’s license number.
  7. Use a separate email address when you post messages to any public forum, such as newsgroups and mailing lists. Free email accounts from Yahoo and Hotmail are perfect for this. Never use your personal email address for this purpose: you will be flooded with spam. You can periodically check this email account to see what’s spam and what isn’t. A bonus is that Yahoo’s spam blocker is better than those from most ISP’s! And your main personal email address won’t be as clogged with spam. Some ISP’s, like AOL and give you multiple email accounts free with your paid service.
  8. Don’t give out any financial information, such as checking account and credit card numbers; and especially your social Security number; on the phone or online, unless you initiate the call and know the person or organization you’re dealing with. Don’t give that information to any stranger. In general, it is only required for medical providers, banks, mortgages and credit card companies.
  9. Don’t fill out the “win a vacation” and other promotions you see in stores and shopping malls.  That will just get you on a junk mailing list and guarantee calls from persistent, high-pressure salesmen.
  10. Don’t pre-print your driver’s license, telephone or Social Security numbers on your checks. And in states that want to use your social security number as your driver’s license number, insist on another method – most allow it.
  11. Report lost or stolen checks immediately. The bank can block payment on the check numbers that are missing. Also, review new checks you receive, to make sure none has been stolen in transit.
  12. Store new and cancelled checks, credit card statements, medical bills, anything with confidential information, in a safe place and shred them when you are done with them.
  13. Guard your Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) for your ATM and credit cards, and don’t write on or keep your PINs with your cards. You should also guard your ATM and credit card receipts. Thieves can use them to access your accounts.
  14. Be creative in selecting Personal Identification Numbers for your ATM and credit cards, and passwords that enable you to access other accounts. Don’t use birth dates, part of your Social Security Number or driver’s license number, address, or children’s or spouse’s names. Remember: If someone has stolen your identity, he or she probably has some or all of this information.
  15. Use a good anti-virus software, anti-adware software and a hardware firewall on your computer, and keep them up to date. You need all three. Almost all modern Routers (Dlink, LinkSys, NetGear, Buffalo, Airlink, etc.) have a hardware firewall built in. See the left side of this page for the current recommendation for ant-virus / anti-malware programs.
  16. Don’t put outgoing mail in or on your mailbox. Drop it into a secure, official Postal Service collection box. Thieves may use your mail to steal your identity.
  17. If regular bills fail to reach you, call the company to find out why. Someone may have filed a false change-of-address notice to divert your information to his or her address.
  18. If your bills include suspicious charges, don’t ignore them. Instead, investigate immediately to head off any possible fraud before it occurs.
  19. Check your credit report regularly. Federal law allows you to obtain one from credit report from each of the 3 major credit reporting agencies per year. See this page for more information.
  20. There are services online, some free, such as SneakMail that provide you with disposable addresses that can be deleted if they begin to receive spam messages. The disposable email addresses forwards email to a real email address of yours, but the sender can not see this. If you create a unique address for each email newsletter or forum you subscribe to you can  discard the address is it gets too much spam and just start using another email address.
  21. NEVER buy anything from a company that sends you spam. Don’t even visit their sites or ask for more information. It is like feeding a stray cat.  Give it one morsel of food, and it will be there all the time (and that may be fine with cats, but NO one wants spammers at the doorstep!).  Remember, since they send out millions of spam emails, they only need a tiny fraction of responses to be profitable.
    And if that doesn’t convince you, consider this: the vast majority of spam “offers” are in fact scams!
  22. Set up filters in your email program. Outlook does this quite easily. When you open an email and realize that it is spam, just click on Actions then Create Rule, then select an appropriate action, such as “from” then click “Move e-mail to folder” and select the “Deleted Items” folder. That’s it!  You’ll never receive email from that particular address or subject again!  More anti-spam filtering tips and information.
  23. If you have a website, do not post your address in the HTML “mail-to” format, otherwise you will be spammed, since address-harvesting spiders (programs) extract your email address from the website and add it to the spammer’s lists.  Instead use feedback forms through PHP, ASP, or JSP that hide the email address, OR post the email address as a GIF (image file).
  24. Check out this list of tips on evaluating email, letters and phone calls you receive for potential scams.
  25. Finally, if it seems to good to be true… IT IS! No one is going to send you a pile of money from a dead Nigerian president, no lottery is going to make you a winner from a “randomly selected from a database of email addresses”.  Multi-level marketing IS A SCAM, ALL psychics are nothing more than conmen, and you can not  make big money from “passive residual income in a few hours of your spare time each day”. And there is no Easter Bunny.

Resources lists and guides – lists of domain extensions for other countries, telephone country codes, area codes, etc.

The bottom line is, if you want to live like a Prince or Princess in a fairy tale, then use common sense, work hard and work smart to achieve your goals.


March 17, 2010 Posted by | Business, Consume, Consumer Scams, Courses, fraud, government resources, Real Estate, Report a Scam, Research sites, Seminars, Share Trading, State Resources, Superannuation, Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How much superannuation do I get paid? Don’t be scammed

Don’t get scammed by your employer, know how much superannuation should you be getting paid?

Here is a guide:

our employer must pay a minimum of 9% of your earnings base into your super account

Generally, as an employee, your employer should be paying super for you if you are:

  • aged 18 years or over but under 70, and;
  • paid at least $450 (before tax) in a calendar month

If you are under 18, you are eligible for compulsory super guarantee if you work 30 hours or more a week.

This is the site I got the information from:

and the article is: Superannuation Guarantee – Individuals

Don’t be scammed follow up on your super and plan for your future.

RoyMcDonald seven year plan ebook by Roy Mcdonald

March 12, 2010 Posted by | Consume, Consumer Scams, Courses, fraud, government resources, Report a Scam, Research sites, Seminars, State Resources, Superannuation | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

I’ve been scammed!!! What do I Do?

First of all go to your local police or authorities and report the scam, then go to

They will show you how to report it their.

Remember that there are many types of scams and just because one area of government won’t follow it up there are more that will. Depending on the scam will depend where you go as well make sure you take the time to report and suport others with your findings.

protect yourself

protect yourself and others from scams

March 9, 2010 Posted by | Consume, Consumer Scams, Report a Scam, Research sites, State Resources | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Roy McDonald, what is a scam?

If we look at the history of a word or the origin of that word, weather it is the meaning of that word in another language or how it is a acronym of a word (slang) we can better understand how to proceed in our situation. If we search around on the word scam we can find some interesting results, on wikipedia we can see the true origin of the words history where it was first used and in what context. Here is a quote from the history of the word scam ;


The first known usage of the term “confidence man” in English was in 1849; it was used by American press during the United States trial of William Thompson. Thompson chatted with strangers until he asked if they had the confidence to lend him their watches, whereupon he would walk off with the watch; he was captured when a victim recognized him on the street.[1]

The true meaning as given on wikipedia is;

confidence trick or confidence game (also known as a bunkoconflim flamgafflegrifthustlescamschemeswindle or bamboozle) is an attempt to defraud a person or group by gaining their confidence.

If we take this a little further and look at the word confidence;

Confidence is generally described as a state of being certain either that a hypothesis or prediction is correct or that a chosen course of action is the best or most effective.

We can start to see that a “confidence trick” (scam) is something that is really up to market forces, as the term would surgest in real estate, “When the market is right, it is right and when the market is wrong, it is right!” This just means that no one really makes the definition singularly, it is a variety of sources that determines the result.

market is any one of a variety of different systemsinstitutionsproceduressocial relations and infrastructures where by personstrade, and goods and services are exchanged, forming part of the economy.

This means that we are always changing and there will always be a negative and a positive to the question, (is this or him or her a scam) what you will need to do is keep yourself up to date with the changes to the situation as tomorrow the market may change. Roy has a saying that goes; Planes fly into buildings! So you can never predict and you must always expect the change will come, it maybe the only prediction you can make.

How will this effect you in the evaluation of a scam? Well lets say a person was involved in being accused of scamming (confidence tick), and they then looked at what they where doing from the perspective of the person that had accused them of this, then change what they where doing. Would this person now be more aware of its consumers? Would their product or services be more in tune with the market now (remember the market is always changing) or would the person that had not had this experience become the one who is not with the times or timing of the market, now could be the one accused of scamming? It can be difficult for a consumer to find the true path they wish to take. That is why I believe a lot in the teachings of my mentor Roy McDonald. He has a primary focus of you purpose in life and where  you want to go and who you want to be. This will cut your decision time down in a big way. You will be well aware of what you want to do and where you want to be thus understanding that industry, product or service better then the average consumer, therefore being able to make a better, educated decision promptly. Have a look at Roy’s Seven Year Plan here this may help you create a future that is more focused and give you more clarity. You should also look for other mentors online that provide a lot of good free advice like Brad Sugars free ebooks.

March 8, 2010 Posted by | Business, Consume, Consumer Scams, Courses, fraud, government resources, Real Estate, Report a Scam, Research sites, Scam Games, Seminars, Share Trading, State Resources, Superannuation, Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fighting Fraud Online with New Offensive

Scam watch join the online offensive

Online fraud and scams has jumped up over the last year with a 16% increase overall in the complaints, 68.6% of that was via the internet. A new campaign from the government site has produced a banner that you can add to your site to help protect consumers.

Article reference:

Channel 7 Sunrise

Full List:

2010 Government partners

2010 Private partners


2010 Community partners

Scams Target you

Add the scam watch banner to your site

March 2, 2010 Posted by | Business, Consume, Consumer Scams, fraud, government resources, Real Estate, Report a Scam, Research sites, Scam Games, Seminars, Share Trading, State Resources, Superannuation | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Neil Jenman Scam? Consumers Alert or Just MASSIVE EGO…

The consumer protector in real estate he says, protecting consumers from scams and fraud in real estate. He has left a trail of destruction all over the place and our friends in New Zealand don’t like him ether.

Don’t tread on his ego because he will go to work on you with his  SEO works online, first article from consumer warning talks about how he just set off to tarnish a person credibility online with his sites. Then property investing forum suggest that they will not advise anyone to consider information on his site and they just want to say away from him.

To quote

If you seek legal advice, the first step of course is to have a cease and desist letter sent which Jenman simply laughs at. In some cases, Jenman further ridicules his victim by boldly publishing his mocking remarks relating to their attempted defense. “If what I said is really untrue then sue me!” This bold response from Jenman gives the impression that he must be telling the truth about his victim, but actually like most intelligent and pre-meditated doers of evil, Jenman knows that the chances of a conviction are slim. Defamation is one of the most expensive and high risk areas of law to defend yourself against and if you lose you have to pay not only your own legal costs (which can vary between $100,000 and $300,000) but you have to repay around 65% of the other sides costs as well. Even if you do win, damages are hard to quantify and there is no guarantee that you will get them. On top of that, it can take 1 – 2 years to get a result. Is it any wonder that most people Jenman defames never go past their first letter of demand? They have little choice but to remain guilty – unable to prove innocence. They suffer in silence or they change their name. The simple fact is, Jenman can say what he likes and unless you have the cash, the time and the will, Jenman wins.

A comment on the article: September 3, 2008 2:09 AM Well written … and well researched. I have been on the receiving end of such bullying tactics of gutter journalists and self-promotion egomainiacs. People like Jenman and Current Affair journo’s like Ben Fordham are the scum of the earth and have no moral values beyond their own egos. They never do real research, they find a person that they think they can destory then create lie after lie to build their case, hidding behind the walls of solicitors and TV cameras. For all those people who have been attacked by these scum, stand tall in the truth, they will be brought to judgement eventually. “Greater is He who is in me (God) than he who is in the world (satan).”

The comments seem to go on and on he really dose not have any fans here..

Then jump on over to a PDF from the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand (REINZ) They have an article here is the first little bit;

The real estate institute of New Zealand (REINNZ) today cautioned people not to accept at face value the extravagant assertions of self-styled consumer advocate Neil Jenman. Jenman, the controversial Australian auther and seminar promoter, who positions hinself as a consumer advocate is currently visiting New Zealand running seminars questioning the ethics of real estate Practitioners. The real purpose of his seminar is to enable him to build his business of “accredited” Jenman system real estate practices.

So here is a bit more on how he works the online world in his favor, a very small amount of his site; registration to “THE NEIL JENMAN GROUP PTY. LIMITED” then, registration to “The Jenman Winners Circle Pty. Limited” also registration to “THE NEIL JENMAN GROUP PTY. LIMITED” then registration to”The Neil Jenman Group Pty.”

they are all title in a way to build his authority in the search engines, you should go to, tag line ‘protecting the man who protects consumers’… has been build to protect is so called reputation?? Why whould a man that protect consumers need a site like that?? hmmm maybe to rank in areas that people slander his name, great key words their Mr. Jenman. His wife and daughter have put together this site it says;

Quote by Reiden Jenman,

To the cowards who make these claims and to one coward in particular (who places our home address on the Internet and puts my family’s safety at risk), I say this to you.

Really i’m confused about this so called consumer protector?? who’s family is at risk! sounds like he has over step and over stayed his welcome with the real estate industry. So how do you evaluate this kind of person when a normal search on a personal name, then scam or scams after it would bring up information about the person that they would not like others to see, his search just brings up every article on everyone else he has named and shamed…what do you think of that Reiden?? And then every other avenue has his sites like ‘’ sites that are built to support his other article sites and written to deceive consumer by implying that his site is, ‘an association develop’ by the industry or the government. Here is a bit from the ‘about’ section on this site.

We monitor agents and salespeople, looking for those who provide the best service for consumers.

In conjunction with Neil Jenman, we also monitor property investment advisers. really is that right? that you monitor agents and salespeople? because it is owned by “The Neil Jenman Group Pty.” and they would recommend agents that only have completed his course or seminar (the Jenman System)  hmm the plot thickens Jenman. or maybe I’m wrong, maybe your motoring site that is owned by you is put there for another reason… what if you jump in the comment or courts and prove me wrong ops that is Jenmans line.

Well drop your thoughts and make your own judgement, i’m done with using his site for any research.

P>S also someone has taken this site down haha good one everthing is always online, so goto: then search

more comments at:

February 25, 2010 Posted by | Business Seminars, Consume, Consumer Scams, Courses, fraud, Real Estate, Real Estate Buying, Real Estate Selling, Real Estate Seminars, Real Estate Trading, Real Estate Wealth Creation, Report a Scam, Research sites, Scam Games, Seminars, State Resources, Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Consumer Scam alert! Home insulation installers

Have you been scammed with the latest government rebate? What has this done to you we would love to here your feedback?

The federal government finally came to a decision on Friday the 19 of February that the  rebate or the home insulation program will finish. I have done some digging based on some of the principles my mentor Roy McDonald has shown me. So Roy if you remember from some of the other articles informed me to jump online and search some of the government websites as the regular news articles are not always right, they can be corrupted by the intention to sell more papers. Going around I found a great article for Victoria; Consumer Alert / Home Insulation Installers, Just click on that and you’ll find a great resources on what to do as a home owner in this mess and also as a installer of the insulation. Here are the topics they cover:

Before you insulate your home,

If you have had insulation installed recently,

If you are currently having insulation installed or are considering doing so.

This is the best one so I copied it over for you:

Insulation safety checklist for householders;

Yes No
Does your ceiling contain halogen down lights?
Does your ceiling contain incandescent down lights?
Do you have a gas heater with a flue that goes into the roof space?
Do you have a fireplace with a chimney that goes into the roof space?
Are there any TV boosters or security alarms installed in the roof space?
Are there any transformers in the roof space, for example, to service a door bell or other low voltage equipment?
Is there a high intensity heating lamp in the bathroom?
Is there an extractor fan in the kitchen or bathroom that vents into the roof space?

If you have had your insulation installed and you are wondering what to do about the safety checks go to Home insulation Program, this site is the department of environment, water, heritage and the arts and the page I have added the link to is the Home Insulation Program it also has information on or advice for installers.

Don’t be the one that is left in the dark on this one,  make sure you know your rights as Roy McDonald would say, get the facts and protect yourself from these scams and ripoffs. Once you have read those few pages you will find the right way to approach making your house safe and then you can receive the maximum benefit from your home insulation.

February 24, 2010 Posted by | Consume, Consumer Scams, government resources, Research sites, State Resources, Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spotting Scams, Learn how in a Game!

Learn how to spot a scam with a specially designed game designed by the government. My mentor Roy MacDonald always told me how important it is to attach a positive state of mind or experience to an event or learning you really want to sink in. The positive state of mind you are in Roy said will help anchor the experience in and therefor you will remember or act in that way without thinking, it becomes a subconscious action a lot quick.

Check out the game here just click on the link, the site is designed for kids but it is always good to have some fun now and then.

You Are Here

I have added a video of Roy McDonald going through the details of his book, he really is explaining his book though a good part of the video Roy talks about how and what he teaches his kids. If you like I believe in Roy’s principles then this is a good video. I also found the link that will get you the rest of the book chapters if you would like to check them out. $1 into $1 Million dollars.

February 15, 2010 Posted by | Consume, Consumer Scams, Courses, government resources, Research sites, Scam Games, Seminars, State Resources, Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

List of the Australasian Consumer Fraud Taskforce: ACFT agencies

Here are a list of the Australian Government sites that are here for a resource;

A collection of great sites this is a perfect resource for you when you are doing you homework, researching a company, person or charity group. Bookmark this page so you have it as a quick reference.

Australian Bureau of Statistics produces research and statistics on personal fraud and scams in Australia.

Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy provides links to Australian Government initiatives to improve online security and fraud awareness.

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is responsible for enforcing the Trade Practices Act 1974 and the state/territory application legislation. It provides advice about scams and how to report them.

Attorney-General’s Department works to improve identity security, combat identity crime and protect the identities of Australians from being used for illegal purposes. Current initiatives include: The National Identity Security Strategy, The National Document Verification Service (DVS), and the ID Theft – Protecting Your Identity booklet.

Australian Communications and Media Authority is responsible for enforcing the Spam Act 2003 and has developed an online tool to report spam.

Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) is Australia’s national crime and criminal justice research agency. Consumers can fill out a scams survey at to gather information to help to improve the prevention, detection, investigation, and prosecution of scam offenders.

Australian Federal Police represented by the Australian High Tech Crime Centre (AHTCC) provides a nationally coordinated approach to technology-enabled crime. Its brief is to combat serious and complex high tech crimes, especially those beyond the capability of a single jurisdiction.
Media contact: National Media Team (02) 6275 7100

Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) investigates scams involving financial products and services including cold calling, phone investment scams and illegal investment schemes.

Great list from the Australian government here are some from the,

New Zealand Government;

Ministry of Consumer Affairs

Commerce Commission of New Zealand

Australian State and Territory consumer affairs and fair trading agencies

State and Territory consumer affairs and fair trading agencies protect and promote the interests of consumers by providing advice and assistance, enforcing state consumer laws, investigating complaints, and resolving disputes.

Office of Fair Trading (OFT)

Consumer Affairs Victoria (CAV)

Office of Consumer & Business Affairs (OCBA)

Office of Fair Trading (OFT)

Consumer Affairs and Fair Trading (CAFT)

Consumer Affairs (Department of Justice)

Department of Consumer and Employment Protection (DOCEP)

Office of Regulatory Services

^ Top

Here is some other ACFT information

Taskforce partners

Taskforce members are joined in communicating with Australian consumers about scams by a range of community, non-government and private sector organisations. A list of Taskforce partners will be available on soon.

Reporting a scam

Consumers who think they’ve spotted a scam can report a scam or find out more information about scams on the SCAMwatch website at or call 1300 795 995.

Scams survey

Consumers can also fill out a scams survey on the Australian Institute of Criminology website Gathering this information will help to improve the prevention, detection, investigation, and prosecution of scam offenders. Aggregated results will be available later in the year from

More information on scams

More information about scams can be found in The Little Black Book of Scams published by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, call 1300 302 502 or visit their website

^ Top

Other useful websites or kits (see individual agencies also)


A site to help you recognise, report and protect yourself from scams. Explore SCAMwatch to find out more about the scams that target you or your small business. SCAMwatch is the campaign portal for the Australasian Consumer Fraud Taskforce.


NetAlert is the Australian Government’s cyber-safety website. The site includes advice and resources on Internet scams, identity theft, spam and other online cyber-safety related issues.

Protect your financial identity

This website provides information for the public about how to protect your financial identity in everyday life and minimise the damage if a problem occurs. This website has been developed by the Australian Bankers Association, the Australian High Tech Crime Centre and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.


The Australian Securities and Investment Commission website for consumers and investors includes warnings about financial scams, lists of illegal investments and unlicensed overseas callers promoting investment opportunities, tips on managing money, and information on how to complain. It also features case studies about people who were made financial offers that were too good to be true.

Stay smart online

The Australian Government’s e-security website for home users and small businesses. The site has a range of information and resources, including quizzes, guides, tools, tips and advice on how to use the Internet safely and confidently.

ID Theft Booklet – Protecting Your Identity

A booklet produced by the Attorney-General’s Department to help Australians prevent, and deal with, identity theft. The Booklet is about how to prevent, and respond to, identity theft. It provides practical strategies on how individuals can protect themselves from becoming victims of identity theft, and what to do if they become a victim of this crime.

February 12, 2010 Posted by | Business, Consume, Consumer Scams, government resources, Real Estate, Research sites, Seminars, Share Trading, State Resources, Superannuation, Training | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment